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20130129
20130129
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> good morning, my name is peter cohen, with the council committee organizations -- look forward to work with this body this year. look forward to working with him and the rest of you all. we have seen the transportation issues increasingly are embedded in the much broader and more complex set of issues around community and economic development; it has pulled affordable housing into the conversation more often than not and i think it is important that we start to move towards a dialogue around transportation, whether it's infrastructure, ridership, the future of the system that thinks holistically about the communities being served in the relationship to jobs, housing. i think this is if you will a more contemporary frame. at the regional level we have been quite active. the conversation of how to do "smart growth" is still right, not a recipe off the shelf. doing also equitable transportation development is also a puzzle. this body continues to be a leader in helping to figure out that puzzle without necessarily having all the answers. we continue to be ahead of the curve; this b
led by supervisor cohen whose district has experienced an inordinate amount of violence throughout this year. we talk about it all the time. what can we do? for one, the ammunition that has been designed especially by law enforcement for military use has no reason to be in our homes and on our streets. and, so, we are introducing legislation focused on what has been labeled to be the hollow point bullets, but there are other types of bullets that are designed for more massive destruction of the human body that should only be in the hands of law enforcement and the military, and not in the civilian hands at all. and we want to ban them from possession in our city of san francisco. so, we're introducing legislation aimed at that kind of ballistics ammunition and banning them from possession in our city. the second piece of legislation is we believe that any person who purchases more than 500 rounds of any type of ammunition, notice should go to our police chief so that we have time to investigate as to reasons why that purchase should be made and understand who is making it. so, we a
present. chu present, supervisor cohen, yes, i'm here. >> cohen present. supervisor farrell. farrell present. kim present. supervisor mar, mar present. supervisor wiener, wiener present. and supervisor yee.y present. mr. president all members are present. >> thank you could you please join us in the problem of allegiance. [pledge of allegiance] i pledge allegiance to the flag, of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. madame clerk are there any communications. >>> there are no communications mr. president. >> and could you read read our consent genta. items one-18 are considered routine and if a member objects a an item may be ri moved and considered separately. >> colleagues would anyone like to sever any of these items, camp poes aye. supervisor chu, sprfer cohen, aye? a. supervisor farrell, aye, supervisor kim? , kim aye, supervisor mar, mar aye, supervisor wiener aye. supervisor ayey. there are answer aye's. those ordinances are finally passed thosances are
committee. i would like to thank supervisor cohen for her confidence in me and appreciate the chance to be with you to highlight a few of my qualifications. i have been a resident of homeowner in district 10 for seven years, a resident of the bay area for 12 years; like many transplant i have fallen in love with our city and have become an active member of our community by becoming engage in political matters in volunteering my time to support good causes. i worked in the clinton white house for three years working presidential personnel and making recommendations on, yes, political appointment in his administration. i have a decent understanding of the political process and the appointment process to be sure. my career in the bay area has been and is the development primarily in large companies now with ernst & young. i also started a food truck with friends. and i chose local vendors to support our local economy. as a district 10 to this and i committed my time to community involvement as well as an advisory committee member with the mission ymca, and supervisor avalos's district
will be back. >> hello. welcome to "meet your district supervisor." we are here with supervisor cohen from district 10. she started her first term in january, so she is new to the board. we will get to know her and talk about the toughest issues facing the city. welcome, supervisor. thank you for joining us. tell us a little bit about your background, where you grew up, where you went to school, and the jobs you have work. >> i grew up in the porthole and neighborhood. most of my childhood, i went to lakeshore elementary school. i love to talk a bell will -- about lowell high school. i studied political science with a concentration in public administration. i worked eight years, largely in the public sector. then, earned a master's degree from carnegie-mellon in pittsburgh pennsylvaniamy work . i spent time as an executive director for nonprofit on the hill. i was assistant to a wonderful person named julie middleton. the park that worked at was formally known as the hunters point community foundation. we did several programming for kids in the neighborhood. i also have a background in pol
to recognize my colleague amelia cohen a strong supporter. i want to thank and congratulate the awardees and thank you for the work that you do to bring awareness and continue to fight and i want to thank the department heads who are here, annemarie conroy who is here. i'm glad that you're here because we will need all of your help to continue this effort. we talk about human trafficking and human trafficking awareness month which begins january eleventh, it's not about this month only. it's the opportunity for us to highlight the issue but it really is something that we ought to be working on all the time when we have the budget before us. we ought to be thinking about it when we have legislation before us, as department heads and you talk about coordination, we ought to be thinking about it. i want to thank you all for being here and i hope that you bring with you sort of a renewed dedication to deal with this issue. is something that we don't need to forget about. it is often hidden. today i want to congratulate everybody. i also want to introduce our speaker that you will be hea
blessed with so many. supervisor kim, supervisor yeee, supervisor cohen and supervisor dufty and those are just too name a few. for mercy, these opportunitis are just few and far between. we were talking earlier, barry and i about how many people st. anthony's sees on a regular basis. these 89 affordable housing units and one manager's unit is an unbelievable accomplishment. and the sad thing it's just a drop in the bucket compared to the need we have. i think all of you know that, which is why you are here today. we're blessed to have the leader here today and i wish all your colleagues in congress could be as supportive as you have been over the years so people would understand the need. unfortunately with the situation that we have nationally, the funding for programs like this are really stretched and there is a lot the doubt if we'll see more of this funding in the future. it's phenomenal to have such a champion here today with us to bring that word back to the folks. [phra*-uplt/] >> i'm going to do more thank yous as we go through the process, but i wanted to just turn it over
, and welcome to millionaire. with $40,000 and smiling from ear to ear is marisa cohen who knows that with that money, she can finally get her dream kitchen. something you've been wanting for a while, huh? >> yes. >> so tell me about that. >> well, i live in manhattan, so i have a typical small manhattan kitchen, and, you know, by the time you put the toaster oven and the microwave and my husband's teas and the peanut butter, there's this much room for me to cook. so i actually, at a recent silent auction, i won a consultation with an architect to, you know, redo our kitchen, but my husband, jeremy, said to me, "well, where are you gonna get the money to do it? go on millionaire." so-- >> is that how this happened? >> one of the ways. that and my children harassing me every time i yelled at the television. >> well, then we better get that kitchen for you. >> yeah, so... >> no question about it. so let's recap where you are. okay, you're still taking on round 1. so far, you have banked $40,000. >> whew, yay. >> you're 10 away from the million. you have one lifeline remaining. >> o
with matt cohen, from off the grid. >> we assembled trucks and put them into a really unique heurban settings. >> what inspired you to start off the grid? >> i was helping people lodge mobile food trucks. the work asking for what can we get -- part together? we started our first location and then from there we expanded locations. >> why do think food trucks have grown? >> i have gotten popular because the high cost of starting a brick and mortar or strong, the rise of social media, trucks can be easily located, and food trucks to offer a unique outdoor experience that is not easily replaced by any of their setting any worlwhere else in san franc. san francisco eaters are interested in cuisine. there adventuress. the fact theyuse grea use great ingredients and make gourmet food makes unpopular. >> i have been dying to have these. >> i have had that roach coach experience. it is great they're making food they can trust. >> have you decided? >> we are in the thick of the competition? >> my game was thrown off because they pulled out of my first appetizer choice. >> how we going to crush
. it seems unbelievable. if it seems such, it just may be. elizabeth cohen joins me live to answer to this miracle. you know, i thought this might be a first-time thing. but it's happened a few times before. double arm transplants. how do they do it? it seems so intricate. >> they have to reconnect everything. you can imagine, this is surgery done at times with a microstop. you're reconnecting -- microscope. you're reconnecting every muscle, every tendon, every nerve. and you're connecting blood vessels. if that limb doesn't get blood, that limb will die. i was just on the phone with a surgeon who's done these before. he said that is the part that really makes you sweat is when you have to put that circulatory system back together. so okay oh is the seventh person -- marrocco is the seventh person to have this double arm transplant. the surgeon told me the biggest part of success is what part of the arm the transplant is done. the closer to the wrist the better. in simple terms, the more of the arm you have to transplant, the more difficult the task is. and brendan's actually, it's
, mark brian, lorenzo, cizi, karen fishkin, peter cohen, fernando, carolyn, bryce, david feather stone, andy, lisa garcÍa. go ahead. >> thank you. good afternoon. my name is steve wu. i'm representing tenderloin neighborhood development corporation. and we are also a member of the council for community housing organizations. we've taken a position opposed to the legislation primarily because we see t.i.c.s as cannibalizing the existing rental housing stock. our rental housing stock is critical to preserve in maintaining the affordability in san francisco's housing. we believe that, furthermore, that the uncapping the conversion condo conversion cap will further incentivize more t.i.c.s forming from our existing rental housing stock, thus leading to -- exacerbating the affordability problem in san francisco. furthermore, the the fee, we have questions about the fee, for bypassing the conversion lottery. it's set as high as 20,000 but as low as 4,000. this is substantially lower than the in lieu fee that the mayor's office of housing has set forth of construction for bmr units through n
, supervisors. peter cohen with the council of housing. we are opposed to this legislation in general because we believe that housing needs to be addressed through housing production. that is what our focus is. and as you've heard for hours today the difficulty with converting housing stock from whatever to whatever, or from whomever to whomever is a devisiveness of pitting san franciscans against each other regardless of class or housing tenure. that's the difficulty, the negativity of this policy approach. but how we got pulled into this particular piece of legislation is when it was crafted as affordable housing strategy through a fee that's being raised. i want to spend a minute on that. it's a very nominal fee, in the context of what it costs to provide affordable housing in san francisco. it's infeasible for t.i.c. owners to be charged for what it really costs to replace a unit so even attempting to go in that creation seems to create a false reality that this is actually doing something significant. i think it was pointed out earlier the nexus study itself on this proposal shows anywhere
't cancel that project. can you work with us? michael cohen phoned me up the next day. can we cut $40 million out of this project? it was one person more responsible than any others, it's tony irons, was the architect that was responsible for the revitalization of city hall who came to my office and said, we cannot abandon this. we can't walk away from this project. we have an opportunity to really take a lot of our values and principles, particularly raising the bar as we did as a city on our green building standards, mandating the most aggressive green building standards for private construction anywhere in the united states. and showcasing them in this new building. >> the city for the sfpuc, it was critical that the building stay as a lead building. the easiest thing to do to cut out millions of dollars, let's just go from lead platinum to lead gold. but that wasn't the objective. this needed to be the best example of energy conservation of any office building in the united states. >> we became involved in the san francisco public utilities headquarter project during the time when
and the state's complaint is a cost issue and i would love to hear a mess cohen's response. for us on may 9/11 commission, checking accounts of that fraud of the birth certificate as one of the most vital things you can do. eve has done a tremendous job digitizing those records. what exactly are the issues with of the states and with amba in terms of not implementing that piece of real idea? >> i will give you a delaware perspective. it is extremely complicated. we have any number of jurisdictions issuing driver's license and i.d. cards. there is so many levels of technology involved with the 14,000 different types of birth certificates. in delaware, we are now just getting moving on the delaware eve records. we have a population of 900,000 and it has been difficult. i don't necessarily think there's a problem, it is just not moving as fast. because we were not doing e- verification for delaware but we are verifying the authenticity of the burst into the get documents electronically and fraudulent documentation. we have been very successful. eve needs to move quicker. we have a huge issue w
correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us with more. >> this will really be interesting to see what they find here because nothing quite like this has ever been done. in essence, this is what they're thinking about doing. take 1,000 players and really follow them, look at their medical records, get measurements and look at all sorts of stuff, and then pick your 100 healthiest, and pick your 100 sickest, and then compare them, and one of the things that they will likely be looking for is how much does football have to do with it? are they sicker because they play a certain position or because they played for a longer period of time and talking about current players and former players and so this is something that's been negotiated and talked about. the nfl says nothing is more important than the health and safety of their players and if you're really into this, cnnhealth.com my colleague stephanie smith has a wonderful article. >> i was talking to two nfl players yesterday about concussions and one of them is going to donate his brain to science in essence and he said it's difficult to know exactly
cohen and kate knots, our transplant coordinators. mary grace hands sell, operating room nurse manager. jon: if you want to continue watching the news conference we'll have it streaming live on foxnews.com. doctors at john hopkins hospital in baltimore announcing they have down a double arm transplant on a very brave army soldier, brandon marrocco. he was the first american soldier to survive the loss of two arms and two legs. it happened in an ied explosion in iraq. it is an experimental surgery but doctors say he will be discharged from the hospital today after they transplanted donor arms. they hope that they will in essence take and that he will be able to gain more utility from those transplanted arms. it is a phenomenal story and he is a very brave veteran. patti ann: just incredible. right now the egyptian government is dealing with another day of violent protests. at least 52 people are dead and the head of the army is warning that the political turmoil is putting the state on the verge of collapse. president mohammed morsi declaring a state of emergency which includes a curfew
, senator cohen's column i call it from delaware will be interested in hearing from him about this issue as well. >> thank you, senator rubio. in the last congress more than three bills we cosponsored were focused on how to create jobs and drive our economy forward. senator hatch, i'm grateful for your leadership and senator klobuchar us who serve together on the judiciary committee and the four of us introduced today the spill of which we are so proud the immigration innovation act of 2013. mr. president, for decades the united peace and joy to commanding advantage being home to all the world's top universities, particularly science and knowledge you come engineering and math in the so-called stem fields and we were the best place for the graduates of those universities and art than science programs to stay homogeny business. but today, that field has changed in our competitors are vying to more supportive environment for innovators, conventions and started companies. there's been a change in the field of opportunity back home for those foreign nationals who in increasing numbers are ed
the top of this morning by mr. cohen -- the op ed by mr. cohen. we will discuss the accuracy, historical and artistically inside, but does a masterful job in suggesting in the real world there are no right angles and no easy answers to very difficult situations. that, to me, was a great service. >> i also liked the movie. it was very entertaining, but it is a movie, and there were some things i really liked and things i did not like. i did not like, for example, the portrayal of the enhanced interrogation techniques. i did not like the fact that it made a false link between torture and intelligence successes. i also think torture does not work, and our programs work because it was not tortured. there were other things i liked about the movie. i liked the fact that it conveyed that this was a 10-year marathon parian rather than a sprint -- rather than a sprint by a president, and the agency was the focus of this effort and succeeded because of the commitment, dedication, and tenacity of its people. i like the fact that it showed the enhanced interrogation program had something to do with
double arm transplants. want to bring in elizabeth cohen. i love stories like this. it's like wow. >> amazing. >> to see that guy smile and say i'm hopeful when he looks at the other arm, maybe this other arm will work well. how did they do this? >> get to one why arm is doing better than the other arm. it may have to do with where the transplants took place. on the right one it was actually above, so the new arm is -- it was here, it was from here down. the other one from somewhere around here down. the more arm you have to transplant the more difficult time somebody's going to have. so that's an important thing to remember. so the more arm you have to transplant, the more difficult the recovery's going to be because these doctors are putting together tendons, muscles, nerves, blood vessels. really tiny surgery. they practiced on cadavers first which i thought was fascinating. trained surgeons, they practiced on cadavers first. >> is it possible that -- he's hopeful, the second arm, is it possible he will have full functioning arms at some point? >> he may not have full functioni
in our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. hopeful for the future. so rare that he has been able to go through successfully this surgery. what does it entail? >> it entails a very long surgery, where doctors have to tediously reconnect muscles, tendons, nerves, blood vessels. i was talking to a doctor, not at hopkins, but somewhere else, who has done a similar one, done the same thing. he said what really made him sweat was the blood vessels. if you don't do it just right, that limb isn't going to get any blood and it will just die. and so that's why these hopkins doctors, they train on cadavers for the past couple of months. they worked on cadavers to practice before they did the real thing. so it is just amazing that this can work at all. and he mentioned that in the one arm, which has -- they transplanted more, he had, that's not his real elbow on that arm, he doesn't have much motion and hopefully after lots of physical therapy that will happen. >> what i love about the story is his spirit and his hope. and i want our viewers to take a listen to what he said what he's mo
that the chief and i and supervisor cohen and dr. campbell and the whole public health staff have always had dialogue and been concerned especially when there is an uptick in june of this year on violent crime and homicides in san francisco. and, so, we've been working together on creating a program which i announced some months ago, the ipo program, the ability to work on things that would interrupt and intervene earlier in the behavior patterns of people that would be both victims and perpetrators of violent crime in our city. to support the police department and law enforcement system of doing more predictive policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic inci
chu, aye, supervisor cohen, aye, supervisor farrell, farrell aye supervisor kim, kim aye supervisor mar, mar aye, supervisor wiener, wiener aye, supervisor yee, supervisor breed? there are 11 ayes. madame clerk can you please begin reading todayth's memoryianians yes on behalf of supervisor kim for the late hs carey stockholders and doctor marlene yens and on behalf the avalos for the late mr. clone. >> that concluded our business for today mr. president. at this time, meeting is adjourned go 49ers. >> i want to learn more about it. >> social networking and e-mail. >> i want to know how to use it. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> divisional divide is a divide between those with access to use digital tools and those who don't. >> with young people, having computers and i just don't know. they're doing it fast. so, i want to know. >> not knowing how to navigate the internet or at a loss of what to do. >> we don't have a computer. >> we're a nonprofit that unites organizations and volunteers to transform lies through literacy. our big problem right now is the broadband opportunity program. a feder
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)